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Re: Funny notations 😁

Posted: 02 Aug 2020, 22:03
by Den
Yes, nothing wrong, but after 3 bar you can go out ... :-)

Re: Funny notations 😁

Posted: 03 Aug 2020, 16:58
by John Ruggero
Usually going out to the three bars follows the performance... :)

Re: Funny notations 😁

Posted: 03 Aug 2020, 18:07
by Anders Hedelin
Useful symbols in parts like this: 🚾 (short rest), or ☕ (shortish rest), or 🍺 (not so short rest), or 🛌 (long rest).

Re: Funny notations 😁

Posted: 04 Aug 2020, 00:12
by hautbois baryton
I'll submit one of my own... took me a while on this one! (still hate the shape of the final slur)
oboe.jpg
oboe.jpg (24.35 KiB) Viewed 637 times

Re: Funny notations 😁

Posted: 04 Aug 2020, 06:39
by OCTO
Anders Hedelin wrote:
03 Aug 2020, 18:07
or 🍺 (not so short rest), or 🛌 (long rest).
I think after a couple of 🍺-rests goes 🚾 then 🛌. So I would be careful when notating several 🍺-rests: maybe as one 🍺-multimeasure rest?

Re: Funny notations 😁

Posted: 04 Aug 2020, 07:21
by Anders Hedelin
You are definitely on to something there, OCTO! I just fear that the multimeasure thing could be a bit risky too: :n4 :n9 🍺...

Re: Funny notations 😁

Posted: 03 Sep 2020, 14:22
by Anders Hedelin
Hindemith's Ludus Tonalis is a learned, contrapuntal piano work, consisting (mainly) of preludes and fugues. Probably you wouldn't expect it to be exactly funny, but here is a score, revised by the composer himself:
Ludus tonalis.PNG
Whether the revision has a didactic or scientific purpose is somewhat unclear.

Re: Funny notations 😁

Posted: 03 Sep 2020, 15:39
by Anders Hedelin
Needless to say, I wouldn't recommend H's approach in your Beethoven edition, John.

Re: Funny notations 😁

Posted: 04 Sep 2020, 01:29
by John Ruggero
I've seen it before, Anders. I don't think it is an actual published revision, but some personal art work given as a gift. I found the following interesting article about it and Mendelssohn's art work:

https://mtosmt.org/issues/mto.10.16.3/m ... alden.html

Yes, I have restricted myself to footnote annotations in the Beethoven piano sonatas; the music is colorful enough on its own.

Re: Funny notations 😁

Posted: 07 Sep 2020, 17:05
by Anders Hedelin
I haven't seen the article before, John. It was interesting in a way, explaining the significance of H's illustrations, which I appreciate. But as it goes with these things, the scientific seriousness of the project somewhat soils the subject.