Page 3 of 3

Re: SCORE Music Publishing System VS. Graphire Music Press

Posted: 25 Nov 2023, 15:01
by OCTO
NorFonts wrote: 14 Nov 2023, 12:51I’m not a lawyer, but my understanding is that you cannot copyright the letter forms and glyph shapes themselves, but only the font software, i.e. the actual outline data, metrics, etc. from the font file itself.
I am not a layer either, but I believe that copyright means "not to copy by any mean", and to copy its actual design. For instance, reading and recording a copyrighted book and putting it publicly without permission is a straight "copyright infringement". What I believe is that the design of a font itself it what is copyrighted, not the vector points. For instance, some copyrighted fonts are not allowed to be embedded, so that its design can't be used on another computer. If design is copied manually and now the exactly the same output is displayed without the right to do it is what is questionable.

As said, I guess it to be is so.

But your engagement and contribution to the musical fonts is outstanding.

Re: SCORE Music Publishing System VS. Graphire Music Press

Posted: 30 Jan 2024, 03:51
by jrethorst
jrethorst wrote: 26 Oct 2023, 04:36 Yahoo groups are gone, and the WordPerfect group is now at https://groups.io/g/wordperfectmac, with free plug-and-play emulators that run any legacy Mac program such as Graphire on any modern Mac (OS 10.6 to Ventura; our Sonoma updates are in final testing).
macOS Sonoma emulator released:

Sheepshaver-WP uses the Sheepshaver emulator to run legacy (OS9) Macintosh programs like WordPerfect on OSX / macOS. Requires macOS 10.6 or later.

With this 2.3.1 update, Sheepshaver-WP now supports OS versions from 10.6 (Snow Leopard) through 14 (Sonoma), and is a 64-bit universal binary that runs natively on Silicon Macs as well as Intel.

Because Apple deleted support for Postscript in macOS versions greater than 12 (Monterey), Sheepshaver-WP now handles printing and PDF creation for newer versions through the Ghostscript program, included with this distribution, which either makes a PDF on your desktop or prints your file. Printing is very fast and just as easy as ever.

If you don’t have a Sheepshaver virtual disk, there’s a free one here at the WPMac group: Databases > Sheepshaver and Basilisk > John's Sheepshaver Disk 2.3. If you don’t have a Sheepshaver application (or want a new one for more recent OS versions), that’s free at https://www.emaculation.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=7360.

Sheepshaver-WP is here at WPMac, in Databases > Sheepshaver and Basilisk > Sheepshaver-WP 2.3.1.

Re: SCORE Music Publishing System VS. Graphire Music Press

Posted: 18 Feb 2024, 11:47
by benwiggy
OCTO wrote: 25 Nov 2023, 15:01 I am not a layer either, but I believe that copyright means "not to copy by any mean", and to copy its actual design. For instance, reading and recording a copyrighted book and putting it publicly without permission is a straight "copyright infringement". What I believe is that the design of a font itself it what is copyrighted, not the vector points. For instance, some copyrighted fonts are not allowed to be embedded, so that its design can't be used on another computer. If design is copied manually and now the exactly the same output is displayed without the right to do it is what is questionable.
In the US, a typeface cannot be protected by copyright, but computer data or instructions can be. Because a font file is "instructions" for creating the design, that can be copyright. But the "shapes" of the type are not protected. So theoretically, you could print out each letter, scan it in, and then create a new font, as you have not copied the digital data.

There are plenty of legal fonts, often free open-source, that are identical or very similar to commercial type. For example, Academico is all but identical to New Century Schoolbook. There are also plenty of "Garamond clones", Libre Bodoni, etc, etc. Of course, there are very slight differences, if you overlay them.

But Monotype can't sue you because your font "looks like" one of theirs. They must show that you have copied their font file.

However, different countries have different laws.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intellect ... _typefaces

There was a music font called Briard, which is identical to Sonata, and which I suspect was 'created' in a font editor from a copy of Sonata itself, as the glyphs have exactly the same curve points and dimensions. That would be a clear breach of law, but I guess no one (apart from me) has time to review and compare all the glyphs of a font, and then start a lawsuit.